Iboy

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Tom Harvey hat Teile eines Smartphones in seinem Gehirn verankert, die ihn von nun an elektrische Geräte steuern lassen. Er kann mit seinen Gedanken ins Internet gehen, Telefonate und SMS zurückverfolgen und große Datenmengen verarbeiten. Als er. iBoy ist ein britischer Science-Fiction-Thriller aus dem Jahr von Adam Randall mit Bill Milner und Maisie Williams in den Hauptrollen. Das Drehbuch. iBoy ist ein Jugendroman des britischen Schriftstellers Kevin Brooks aus dem Jahr Inhaltsverzeichnis. 1 Handlung; 2 Textanalyse. Literarische Gattung. iBoy: Roman: emmabodabanan.se: Brooks, Kevin, Gutzschhahn, Uwe-Michael: Bücher. iBoy ist eine Verfilmung des gleichnamigen Kevin-Brooks-Romans, in dem ein Teenager nach einem Gewaltakt durch Smartphone-Komponenten in seinem.

iboy

iBoy ist ein erschienener Science-Fiction-Thriller-Jugendroman von dem britischen Schriftsteller Kevin Brooks. Die deutsche Ausgabe erschien bei. iBoy ist eine Verfilmung des gleichnamigen Kevin-Brooks-Romans, in dem ein Teenager nach einem Gewaltakt durch Smartphone-Komponenten in seinem. Kevin Brooks: iB0Y emmabodabanan.se 5. Problematik. „iBoy“ vereint unterschiedliche Sujets und Genres: Er ist Fan- tasy-Roman und Liebesgeschichte. Tom versucht damit klarzukommen und findet dabei einen iboy Weg. LukasFor automesse are Aktuelle News zu weiteren Filmen. Wissenswertes. Januar auf dem Video-on-Demand-Portal Netflix veröffentlicht. Spiderman oder Batman entstanden sind, nur damit alle verstehen, auf welchem Level wir gefahr ganze folgen da befinden :- Nichtsdestotrotz ist iBoy toll geschrieben und die Handlung und vor allem das Umfeld etwas, article source dem sich viele Leser auseinandersetzen müssen oder mussten. Ich hoffe es gibt eine Fortsetzung!!! Aymen Are domhnall gleeson star wars sorry. iboy

Iboy Video

iBoy - Official Trailer [HD] - Netflix Here we have the familiar source iboy modern technology into futuristic high tech iBoy himselfthe superhero moral dilemmas about abuse of power with some gratuitous violence and foul language thrown in. Company Credits. There is also frequent usage of continue reading language, which I article source annoying and excessive. Was this review helpful to you? Wheelman This read article could have been more click here okay. Orbiter 9 A Click the following article teenager is forced by a computer hacker to do his bidding. Books by Kevin Brooks. London Has Fallen. Bühnenstofflisten zum Download. McKell David. Kevin Brooks. Lucy ist ein normales Mädchen, welches etwas erlebt, was keiner erleben soll. Nach einigen Tagen erwacht er und erfährt vom behandelnden Arzt, dass nicht alle Teile des IPhones entfernt werden konnten. Eines Iboy macht er sich auf den Weg zu ihr, all the young pope kinox something sie ihm etwas sagen möchte und er hofft, es geht dabei um holzkirchen jennerwein beide - im positiven Sinne. Januar auf dem Video-on-Demand -Portal Netflix veröffentlicht. Adam Randall. Sachbuch Psychologie. Vorschauen Vorschauen dtv.

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What's New: Support macOS July, iBoysoft Data Recovery V3. What's New: Improved pre-recovery preview feature. What can he do with his new powers — and what are they doing to him?

Before the attack, Tom Harvey was just an average teen. But a head-on collision with high technology has turned him into an actualized App.

Fragments of a shattered iPhone are embedded in his brain. And they're having an extraordinary effect on his every thought.

Because now Tom knows, sees, and can do mo What can he do with his new powers — and what are they doing to him? Because now Tom knows, sees, and can do more than any normal boy ever could.

But with his new powers comes a choice: To avenge Lucy, the girl he loves, will he hunt down the vicious gangsters who hurt her?

Will he take the law into his own electric hands and exterminate them from the South London housing projects where, by fear and violence, they rule?

Not even his mental search engine can predict the shocking outcome of iBoy's actions. Get A Copy.

Paperback , pages. More Details Original Title. Tom Harvey. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

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Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of iBoy. But with his new powers comes a choice: To avenge Lucy, the girl h iBoy, , Kevin Brooks What can he do with his new powers -- and what are they doing to him?

May 15, Jo rated it it was ok Recommended to Jo by: Angela. I mean, I can use a computer. I can use a phone.

I can use a Kindle. But when people say that they prefer Windows to Apple, I zone out. Do I have to choose between them? No, I refuse.

A boy is standing under a block of flats and someone throws an iPhone off the 30th floor and it embeds himself into his head.

Never mind. A fact, I feel, that was proven by me actually picking up this book. I understand that this story will never and could never happen.

So I was OK with this and I was quite happy to read a story where everything was left a bit up in the air.

There were times when this story descended into a bit of an instruction manual and it left me completely lost and it managed to yank me out of a story that I was actually really involved in.

There was absolutely tons of info-dumping. I mean actual info-dumping. There is part of the iPod instruction manual in a chapter.

I have to admit it would be handy. The more I tried to understand… the more delirious I became. He did it in Naked and, to some extent, he did it with iBoy.

If you took away the iPlot and the zapping, this book would have been so good. And I love that about him because, even though it was uncomfortable and it was realistic and brilliant.

Which is crazy because I know that Mr Brooks can write emotions and darker subjects with subtlety and tact but this one was just way too much.

Also, for extra iLOLZ… this main event of this story happened the day before my birthday. The perfect balance between hero and regular kid, I really wanted to get to know him and not iBoy.

And, of course, I loved Lucy. What a little sweetheart. I so wish this had been a contemporary book because I know that it would have been unforgettable instead of being memorable for all the wrong reasons.

View all 6 comments. Feb 26, Ramon Van Kessel rated it really liked it. The story of iBoy is simply a story of a guy, Tom Harvey, being a superhero and protecting the girl, Lucy, he secretly likes.

Not a hero who is really strong, but one who uses knowledge and technology to his favor, by using his iBrain, which he got after an accident of an iPhone falling in his head.

The book appealed to me because I personally like technology and was interested how this would be implemented in a book.

The story itself is well put together, but sometimes it was predictable and I The story of iBoy is simply a story of a guy, Tom Harvey, being a superhero and protecting the girl, Lucy, he secretly likes.

The story itself is well put together, but sometimes it was predictable and I could guess what was going to happen in the future.

On the other hand is the story an eye-opener, it describes the horrible things that also happen in real life in those neighborhoods that Tom and Lucy live in.

You realize how horrible it is to be in that position and you genuinely feel for the character. They are very true to live. All in all, I really liked reading this book, even though the plot was rather simple.

I would recommend it to people who are not really demanding readers and like a more simple, entertaining story. Jan 12, Ms.

Yingling rated it it was amazing Shelves: young-adult. Tom is eking out an existence in a drug addled London housing project when an iPhone is thrown from a 30th floor of his building, hitting him on the head and embedding fragments in his brain.

The same people who threw the phone are also responsible for the gang rape of his friend, Lucy. His whole being is now hooked up to the internet, and he is able to shock people just by touching them.

Feeling that his powers may not last long, he attempts to find out who attacked Lucy and bring them to justi Tom is eking out an existence in a drug addled London housing project when an iPhone is thrown from a 30th floor of his building, hitting him on the head and embedding fragments in his brain.

Feeling that his powers may not last long, he attempts to find out who attacked Lucy and bring them to justice, a quest that takes him all the way to the very dangerous drug overlord of the area who has a horrifying connection to Tom's family.

Strengths: Brooks is a phenomenal writer who can make the gritty realities of life more vivid than anyone I know.

The combination of inner city gang wars and technology were riveting. Gave this one to Surly Teen Boy to read. Weaknesses: F-bombs all over the place, so not for middle school, especially with the rape of the friend.

I was somewhat surprised; one of the things I liked best about Candy was that the language and situations were circumspectly covered.

Nov 28, Hannah rated it it was ok. This book could have been more than okay. It could have been good. IF I hadn't been cringing away from it with every page I turned.

IF I hadn't felt required to keep the book hidden so that younger siblings couldn't stumble upon it. IF our lovely Mr.

Kevin Brooks hadn't decided to include an expletive on every page. I get it, Mr. What's-his-face-Tom lives in an ugly part of town.

And gang members swear in ugly parts of town. The good guys swear. Heck, even our damsel in distress This book could have been more than okay.

Heck, even our damsel in distress has no qualms about dropping the F-bomb. Thanks for that accurate picture. What you don't realize, oh lovely Mr.

Kevin Brooks, is that swearing looks a heck of a lot worse when it's on paper. But no. You had to marinate the book in ugly words.

You had to soak, rinse, and repeat it in expletives. You had to bash us on the head with the F-bomb.

And over. Until I gave up. Right at the climax. The book was simply not worth it. All the words that should have been starred or blacked out just gave me one very clear message.

Dear lovely Mr. Kevin Brooks, You have a vocabulary the size of a period. Love, Lillian View 1 comment.

Jul 24, Alex Boyle rated it really liked it. During the event of scanning through many novels in the "Teen" section of the library, my eyes stopped and lay still on the black laminated spine of this book.

The title read "iBoy". I considered since I had been playing on my iPod a lot over the school break iBoy may be the appropriate read.

To make sure it was about iPods, iPhones or iPads,not someone with bad sentence structure stating that he was a boy, I had a quick flip at the back summary of the book.

This should be where I quote the summ During the event of scanning through many novels in the "Teen" section of the library, my eyes stopped and lay still on the black laminated spine of this book.

This should be where I quote the summary but it would be too long. Basically, it's about a kid who gets an iPhone thrown at his skull and then he gets magical iPhone powers.

It was one of those moments where I was like "OK But despite the utterly stupid science behind the plot, a force pulled me back to that novel,the thought of how I had to do some more book reviews, and fast.

So I read the first sentence of the first page. I was hooked. The author is a brilliant writer.

The category this novel slips under is 'A book with themes we've studied in class in term one' Knowledge is power this is because the main character uses his iPhone inside his head to give him the knowledge to find who 'damaged' his friend, Lucy.

This category was interesting because each author can give a view of how they interpret knowledge being power.

My favourite quote from iBoy is "Knowledge is power" because anybody questioning if this novel does fit under the term 1 category can just turn to page Something new I learnt from this book is that you can die if millions of calls suddenly come to your phone, as your phone's battery will over heat then explode.

This was how the main character defeated a gang in the end of the book. He used his iPhone's knowledge of that, then hacked into all the phones in the world and directed all their calls to six guys.

Some died brutally as their pants exploded. I mostly leave my phone off now. A character that interested me in this book was iBoy.

As he could research anything from his brain, hack all bank accounts in the world and give people electric shocks. This made me think his powers were pretty "creative" Overall I'll give this novel a four.

It would have been a five, but the ending was very slow and boring, and left me thinking of nothing. Feb 07, Mariam Sarhan rated it really liked it.

This was a pretty interesting book, revolving around the topic of revenge, and why people do the things they do. I found it pretty interesting and laced with an abundance of hidden meanings and motives.

If you like slightly dark but complex and intricate books, this is the book for you! This book totally blew me away. And i have no regrets.

This is one i am going to recommend to a lot of people. Feb 06, Mandy rated it liked it. Overall, I liked this.

I really did, with a slight feeling of too-little-too-quick. Of course, as soon as I'd completed it I flipped into Safari to check what other Goodreaders thought.

The language, as I suspected, was a major issue. I've no problem with the author using a wide range of profanities as I'm well beyond the age where such proclivities are considered unwholesome.

Indeed, I'm preparing an entire range of new expletives for my eventual entrance to a nursing home, reserved for people Overall, I liked this.

Indeed, I'm preparing an entire range of new expletives for my eventual entrance to a nursing home, reserved for people who bring me handkerchiefs and cutting propagators for Christmas rather than bottles of Grand Marnier or Bombay Sapphire.

But what were people expecting from a gangland novel about group rape? This isn't an easy book, and I must say I'm unsure where it's aimed.

I'm in no way an advocate of age-ratings on books, but this is a book which, as I say, features a gang rape as a plot device.

I'd say it's more than 'young adult' but less than 'fiction', if you're browsing in your local library. But there we are - to go back to the start of all this paragraph's furore: when does one become aware of the existence of bad language?

Or, perhaps, one might ask how the little buggers know to tattle on each other the minute the dreaded words are uttered?

What if incorporating such words into a text isn't a matter of educating young people in the art of the expletive, but simply acknowledging that these words exist, fit perfectly into the environment of the novel as described, and it's actually a situation of trust between the author and the reader, who includes them for realism and no more expects to be accused of promoting excessive swearing than of being accused of promoting gang rape.

The language thing, I would argue, reflects an issue with the reader, not the writer. The rape itself is also a realistic plot device.

There is no luridity; it's an awful event which occurs, and which engenders emotions within both the protagonists and the participants. If you're looking for a redemption theme here, it's missing - the rapists are through and through unreticent, and the book ends up oddly patchwork as a result - the actions of the heroes and villains are not intended to be compared, but the author visits this theme slightly and there is little redemption - iBoy's actions are vigilante and increasingly brutal, giving a credible and potentially satisfying moral outcome.

Similarly, iBoy muses on the virtues of taking from the rich to help his immediate family, and ultimately fails to reconcile his personal views with his own actions.

It's a conundrum, true, but an author who poses such questions should really attempt to answer them, rather than chicken out with the vagaries of an invented character.

Obviously, we suspend reality to enjoy the book, but I couldn't manage to get all the way into the iWorld - I'm ultimately left thinking that iBoy went over the iTop - it was all too convenient, and eventually became as iIrritating as me putting 'i' in front of everything.

The iProblem Dr Manhattan Watchmen is the ultimate result of this path; a superhero whose powers so separate him from humanity that he becomes truly alien.

The eventual power-foiling climax is a good read, a bit of entertainment, but doesn't touch on this idea at all; that iBoy is now a new race, separate from humanity and, indeed, beyond its petty ideas of one human being being worth more than another.

In writing terms, I have to say it pales in comparison to the manner in which David Rice's equally superhuman powers are fully explored by Steven Gould in Reflex, the sequel to Jumper.

All that said, this was a great book. I liked it a lot, and Kevin Brooks brings a chill to my skin when I hear another book's due.

Black Rabbit Summer was great, and the apparently massive language problem wasn't a problem for me. What I was concerned about was the fizzling out of a perfectly executable idea; it all came to fruition too soon.

Double the weight of this tome, or add a sequel. I loved everything about this book. Iboy is now one of my favorite science fiction novels.

I thought the idea of an iPhone giving Tom special powers was really cool and creative. Also I really enjoyed how Tom changes throughout the story and learns more about himself.

IBoy would be an incredible movie. View 2 comments. Sep 27, Lasse Carlsson rated it really liked it Shelves: favorites. Buying the premise of iBoy requires a vast amount of suspension of disbelief- no, strike that!

An insane amount. But if you ignore the fact that the novel should've ended after chapter one, because having an iPhone thrown in your face from several stories' altitude would kill you, and that iPhone parts in your brain would cause more internal bleeding than extrasensory power, you'll find an exciting and emotionally gripping, for Young Adult standards, story.

The story revolves around sixteen year Buying the premise of iBoy requires a vast amount of suspension of disbelief- no, strike that!

The story revolves around sixteen year old Tom Harvey who ends up with a broken skull from a falling iPhone. When he awakens from the hospital and returns to his home in crimeridden Crow Town, London, he finds out that his childhood sweetheart, Lucy, has been assaulted and raped by a local gang.

However, Tom has means of revenge- the iPhone parts in his brain connects him to the digital world and he has godlike control of electronics.

As he wages his one man war against the gangs, he starts to wonder if he really is using the powers for good or if he simply finds too much joy in the chaos he makes.

The novel explores the concept of moral relativism extremely well. We were of course never really going to side with the gangs so we always find Tom's actions sympathetic but as he wonders if lowlife lost boys really deserve being smited by his superpowers, we understand him.

It is an interesting story about the absolute corruption of absolute power, and seeing how even fighting for a good cause can turn you into a monster is quite refreshing in the often so black-and-white superhero story.

Another thing I like is this story's very mature portrayal of rape. The character of Lucy is quite flat, and she sadly devolves into your typical damsel-in-distress later, but her reaction to the assault is very emotionally gripping and subtle.

Finally this book gives a gripping portrayal of gang culture and how indifference to the problem only makes it worse However, as I read this book for the second time, I realised a bit more flaws, and especially one thing prevents iBoy from being a GREAT book: we don't know the characters from before Tom's accident.

Even though this book makes snarky remarks about superheroes, this is essentially a superhero origin story, and a key ingredient is that the alter ego must also be interesting before taking up his mission.

Barry Allen was a police scientist investigating his mother's death before becoming the Flash, Stephen Strange was in the medical business for the money rather than helping people before an accident set him up to be an altruistic sorcerer supreme and Bruce Wayne wanted to kill Joe Chill, his parents' assassin, before realizing that was not the righteous way.

The only thing we learn about Tom Harvey is that he was an ordinary boy without special plans and that he kinda liked his childhood friend.

Not necessarily a bad guy, but is he exciting? Instead we should've been given more time with him to see his reactions to the gang violence in his city, explore his relationship with his grandmother and Lucy.

That way we could also meet Lucy before the rape and see how much things had changed, when Tom returned to the land of the living.

That would give the rest of the novel a lot more emotional weight. But honestly try and pick this one up.

Me spending so much time on how it could have been perfect just means that this is a book I have strong feelings for, and despite the outlandish premise it is good fun.

And with the new film adaption ready on Netflix, maybe now is as good as time as any to read it Oct 18, jay tee rated it it was ok Shelves: young-adult-fiction.

Ipod, ipad, itunes, isnack.. He finds himself permanently connected to all things internet after bits of an iphone are embedded in his brain.

The phone was hurled at him deliberately by local gang members who then go off and rape his best friend, Lu Ipod, ipad, itunes, isnack..

The phone was hurled at him deliberately by local gang members who then go off and rape his best friend, Lucy.

As Tom adjusts to his amazing new powers the scene is set for revenge Reading this book gave me that weird cringing feeling. Here we have the familiar extension of modern technology into futuristic high tech iBoy himself , the superhero moral dilemmas about abuse of power with some gratuitous violence and foul language thrown in.

And we also have tried and true young adult fiction plot enhancers such as the awkward teenage boy who has a secret crush on his childhood girlfriend and the all too common orphan whose parentage is shrouded in mystery.

Aug 05, Kate rated it really liked it Shelves: read-in This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. I had no preconceptions about this book not knowing the author or much about the plot. I knew it was a teen fiction book and given my recent Children Literature course, I was interested to see how this book fit into the tradition of children's literature.

My initial reaction was that this pulled no punches.

Iboy Statistiken

Er macht sich auf die Suche nach den Tätern und findet heraus, dass sie einer Gang angehören und eigentlich Lucys Bruder Ben bestrafen wollten, der einen Auftrag verweigert hat. Kinder und Familie. Veranstaltungen Autorenempfehlungen. Das Drehbuch basiert auf dem https://emmabodabanan.se/hd-filme-stream-kostenlos-ohne-anmeldung/pastewka-staffel-8.php Roman von Kevin Iboy. Alle Leserstimmen. LukasJuni Aber auch in seiner wirklichen Gestalt kümmert er sich um Lucy, so dass sie sich auf beiden Ebenen näher kommen. Current Article source. Aber sein Rachefeldzug bringt Lucy in tödliche Gefahr.

Not necessarily a bad guy, but is he exciting? Instead we should've been given more time with him to see his reactions to the gang violence in his city, explore his relationship with his grandmother and Lucy.

That way we could also meet Lucy before the rape and see how much things had changed, when Tom returned to the land of the living.

That would give the rest of the novel a lot more emotional weight. But honestly try and pick this one up. Me spending so much time on how it could have been perfect just means that this is a book I have strong feelings for, and despite the outlandish premise it is good fun.

And with the new film adaption ready on Netflix, maybe now is as good as time as any to read it Oct 18, jay tee rated it it was ok Shelves: young-adult-fiction.

Ipod, ipad, itunes, isnack.. He finds himself permanently connected to all things internet after bits of an iphone are embedded in his brain.

The phone was hurled at him deliberately by local gang members who then go off and rape his best friend, Lu Ipod, ipad, itunes, isnack..

The phone was hurled at him deliberately by local gang members who then go off and rape his best friend, Lucy. As Tom adjusts to his amazing new powers the scene is set for revenge Reading this book gave me that weird cringing feeling.

Here we have the familiar extension of modern technology into futuristic high tech iBoy himself , the superhero moral dilemmas about abuse of power with some gratuitous violence and foul language thrown in.

And we also have tried and true young adult fiction plot enhancers such as the awkward teenage boy who has a secret crush on his childhood girlfriend and the all too common orphan whose parentage is shrouded in mystery.

Aug 05, Kate rated it really liked it Shelves: read-in This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.

I had no preconceptions about this book not knowing the author or much about the plot. I knew it was a teen fiction book and given my recent Children Literature course, I was interested to see how this book fit into the tradition of children's literature.

My initial reaction was that this pulled no punches. The 'attack' mentioned in the blurb on the back cover is in fact a gang rape of a 16 year old girl by a council flat high-rise gang.

The book also includes violence, thoughts of suicide and s I had no preconceptions about this book not knowing the author or much about the plot.

The book also includes violence, thoughts of suicide and swearing and as a mum-to-be, I immediately framed myself as a parent and wondered if I would want my child to read this.

The conclusion I came to was a resounding 'yes'. Whilst it is true that the book is filled with gritty realism, there is also much internal and external debate about morality, the meaning of right and wrong and debating the consequences of violence.

The protagonist is Tom, a boy who is struck my a falling iPhone who wakes from the resulting coma to find his brain has all the abilities of an iPhone and more powers besides.

Brooks works hard at rationalising the technicalities of how thus could be but really, do we care? I was willing to take the leap of faith needed in any superhero story.

Because this is what this boiled down to; a superhero kid takes revenge on the sick thugs who ruined the life of the girl he loves.

Whilst there were some interesting characters such as the foul-mouthed cigar smoking grandmother of Tom who wrote romance novels to support them both, and Tom himself who was fully developed, the 'baddies' were pretty one-dimensional.

This is a small criticism though. All in all, I enjoyed the book thoroughly and would read more Brooks again. Dec 20, Paula Phillips rated it really liked it.

Imagine getting hit in the head one day by an Iphone of all things and it turning out to be the weirdest day of your life and the last day that you will ever be normal to speak of.

Tom lives in a dodgy part of London known as Crow Town with his nan Grams as his mum was killed in an accident when Tom was younger.

In the flats lives his best friend Luce and her brother Ben. One day Luce asks Tom to meet her , next thing he knows is he's been hit in the head and wakes up in hospital.

He discovers t Imagine getting hit in the head one day by an Iphone of all things and it turning out to be the weirdest day of your life and the last day that you will ever be normal to speak of.

He discovers that he was hit in the head with an Iphone and that Luce was gang-raped and her brother Ben was left half-beaten to death.

Over the next course of the time , Tom lays in a coma and then when he wakes up he discovers he's intelligent and has superpowers as parts of the Iphone are still fragmented in his brain.

He can control anything electronically and soon finds himself a bit of a superhero like Superman and he calls himself iBoy. Can he get revenge on those who hurt Luce?

What will happen when he discovers that the mysterious leader of the Crow Town flats gang has a connection to his mother's death? Will Tom put his new powers to good use and will he realise that sometimes trying to do the right thing is alot harder than it should be.

Dec 29, Laura rated it did not like it Shelves: did-not-finish , arc , read , own , review-on-blog , young-adult , ala But I didn't really think that was fair, so I decided to give it a chance.

Aaannnddd that sure worked out well sarcasm. I read over 40 pages before I gave up. Sorry, I couldn't get over that. It was just so implausible I felt gypped.

I kept going, "Really? I also put it down because it had some dark and violent elements that I didn't really want to get further details about or imagine.

It's just too hard. Basically there were a lot of things that added up to me just placing the book aside because it wasn't my type at all.

I wouldn't recommend. Feb 05, Ruth Hawes rated it really liked it. I saw the movie on Netflix and loved it so much that I decided to pick up the book.

If you love technology then this book is for you, not only is it focused around many technological advances but the ideas throughout the book are genius given the fact it was written 7 years ago.

While walking home Thomas Harvey gets a phone thrown at his head, he wakes up in hopsital and has aquired new powers because of the parts of the phone in his head.

With these new powers he starts to seek revenge against I saw the movie on Netflix and loved it so much that I decided to pick up the book.

With these new powers he starts to seek revenge against the gangs in the local estate who are dealing drugs, killing people etc.

He becomes the vigilante Iboy and discovers his powers can do harm as well as good. I loved this book but I did feel that the movie was better.

This was because I felt the books storyline went off on tangents and I felt that some parts were unnecessary.

The film was better as they removed the excess parts and focused on the unique central theme of the book. This is an amazing book with an amazing concept but you must be open to technological advances.

May 29, Nic Thomsen rated it did not like it. I had to read this book for my English class grade Although there are so many wondeful books with a meaning and which might even change lifes I had to read this one.

I didn't like it obviously and as much as I try to see something positive about it the only thing that comes to my mind is: it's short and very simply written which also kind of annoyed me, actually.

The author tried very hard to be funny, it almost physically hurt me. The interesting topics e. Jun 12, Roberta Jayne rated it liked it.

OH I used to be in love with this book. Then I grew up such a shame and my tastes have changed and the flaws in this book stick out a lot clearer than they used to.

Still so good though. Kevin Brooks knows how to write a good story. Oct 23, Ruth marked it as abandoned. View all 15 comments.

I would never, ever read this. Because honestly, I think the premise is ridiculous. Except Kevin Brooks wrote it. And I love him.

So, I at least have to give it a chance. View all 5 comments. Mar 26, Noav rated it liked it. At first I liked it but then as I continued my dislike for this book grew.

The idea of a boy who get superpowers because of an iPhone in his heads seems ridiculous. Maybe if I had been a little younger I might have enjoyed the book.

I did like the gang related theme. But the drugs and rapist in combination with the guy who gets an iPhone in his head and survives is silly.

Sep 11, Tony Nguyen rated it it was amazing Shelves: science-fiction. This is a really interesting book, there is a twist don't you can not resist.

I love this book. A superhero created by a tragic. I would recommend this book this anyone who loves sci-fi books. Apr 25, Genevieve rated it really liked it.

Hmm, I underestimated how much I would like it. Pretty good. Dec 12, Tina rated it liked it. See full review here. What happens when an iPhone cracks your skull and its electrical components become embedded into your brain?

Well, in the iBoy world, it gives you superpowers, with skin that lights up in a myriad of pulsating colours, hands that can shoot electricity and a brain that can surf the net, call phones and hack into government networks.

I looked forward to reading iBoy. Having read and liked Being by Kevin Brooks, and being a big fan of science fiction and cyborg stories, I opened this book with expectations of a slightly violent, but absorbing action sci-fi novel.

Sadly, this book didn't live up to my hype. First of all, let me make this clear. There are sex scenes less so in iBoy , drugs, weapons, street violence and death, sometimes with a hero who discovers he has been technologically advanced.

In the case of Being, the protagonist was an android robot that looks like a human , and in iBoy, the hero is a cyborg human with robotic enhancements.

There is also frequent usage of coarse language, which I found annoying and excessive. The writing in general was fast paced and very truthful at times, but choppy to convey Tom's thoughts.

However, these combined elements work together to evoke the setting: the streets of outer London.

I didn't like this setting, because I thought the iBoy idea, of a boy with the powers of an iPhone, had a lot of potential to be something big.

But a street setting meants that iBoy's powers and scope extended only to attacking the bullies in his neighourhood.

Perhaps Kevin Brooks was going for a deeper meaning, such as an exploration of social issues or the abuse of power, but I didn't connect with that.

The technological aspects attracted me, as a sci-fi lover, but I thought it wasn't explored well. Tom is hit by an iPhone, and when he wakes up, he has incredible amounts of power, while we are never given a cool scientific reason as to why.

The components are in his brain, but which part of his brain? And why does several chips from an iPhone, embedded in his brain suddenly give him so much power?

Such as electricity coming out of his hands? Tom is left alone through the novel to explore his immese powers, and there are many questions I was left wondering with.

Also, the fact that an iPhone 3G is described in this book places a year label on this story. It's like a "use-by" date.

In my opinion, good novels do not indicate a specific date, thus immortalising the story and characters, and limited only by the language.

However, I like the use of quotations from articles and the binary chaptering system. The characters in iBoy weren't very strong. Usually, I relate to a particular character, or have a admire one for all their flawed and postive qualities.

I didn't with this book, perhaps because there were little characters and the main character began to act without thought. This was eventually explained, but by the end of the book, what little of Tom's personality had been there previously was not regained.

This book is not as strong as Being was, and I couldn't connect with the characters and darkness in this book. But its inner themes are gripping, and several moments are very intense and action-packed.

The male protagonist and his powers relating to a modern device would definitely appeal to a young male audience.

Jul 27, Carly rated it really liked it Shelves: reviewed. I must admit, when I first read about iBoy and learned it was the story of a teenage boy who was hit on the head by an iPhone and then acquired powers I was somewhat sceptical.

Sure, the premise might sound a little strange to those of us who prefer our novels a little fluffier but it makes for excellent I must admit, when I first read about iBoy and learned it was the story of a teenage boy who was hit on the head by an iPhone and then acquired powers I was somewhat sceptical.

I found it so easy to suspend my disbelief and the quotations and technical extracts at the beginning of each chapter were really fascinating.

The gang members in iBoy are absolutely terrifying and extremely well-written; I always think the writing in a novel must be great if I really hate the villains and iBoy definitely fell into this category.

Ellman was absolutely vile and I was willing Tom on to defeat him the whole time. Brilliant stuff, absolutely gripping.

Iboy — fair enough. Apple are truly taking over the world. Jan 11, Matt rated it liked it Shelves: read-in I don't really know what audience was intended here since the writing style and content are at odds with one another by about four years of maturity.

With a 16 year-old protagonist that is morally gray, especially in the first half -- and action scenes and character development that comes at you so fast that it's over before it starts -- I think this book is perfect for 8th graders with ADD from gritty, broken homes who can handle "older content.

It's that kind of thing. It's perfect for reluctant readers but, ethically and thematically, I think some of this is pretty dark and these character's are resignedly apathetic.

But, in the world Brooks describes, hey, that's their reality. This shit happens in some cities on some blocks.

It gets brighter at the end, lesson learned, but "rape" is not new ground for teen fiction. It's been done better in more traditional contemporary.

It's unique. It's decent enough. Take it with a grain of salt. Nov 10, Jennifer Rayment rated it it was amazing. He grinned. I mean, that's actually pretty good, isn't it?

She laughed. This was my first book by Kevin Brooks. I always wanted to read something by him, but never got around to.

Overall I liked it, although not as much as other young adult books I've read. As a result he's a lot like Tony Stark with the Extremis, meaning his brain is online and he can do pretty much everyt This was my first book by Kevin Brooks.

As a result he's a lot like Tony Stark with the Extremis, meaning his brain is online and he can do pretty much everything.

Now, this sounds kind of silly, but once you accept the premise, it's actually quite interesting. Tom, who lives with his grandmother in a bad neighborhood, starts using his powers for acts of vengeance, or at least vigilantism.

The questions this poses are of course: does vengeance solve anything? Where do you draw the line when stopping crimes?

What do you do when you can do anything? Basically, I had two problems with this book: one, it was too similar to the idea in Iron Man: Extremis , and it kind of felt like he lifted that idea from there.

Two, the superhero fantasy and the stark realism of Tom's environment didn't mesh very well, at least not for me. And I have to say that a lot of plot threads weren't really resolved in the end, or dealth with a little too quickly.

But it was still an entertaining read, and I didn't hate it. I just had higher expectations, I suppose, and while it was interesting, this isn't a book I necessarily would have wanted to read as a teenager.

I'd recommend a book by John Green over this one any day, I think. Oct 23, Krista rated it really liked it.

This novel surprised me. When I picked it up, I was not expecting to be enthralled, but that's how it ended. The book is about a year old boy, Tom Harvey, who lives in England.

He has grown up in the projects of Crow Town, and spent his life dealing with the realities of the very active gang life in the area.

One day, an iPhone is thrown at Tom from the 30th floor of a building and it splits his skull. The result: 17 days in a coma and nanofragments of the iPhone are embedded in his brain.

H This novel surprised me. He soon realizes that the iPhone pieces are active and melding with his thought. Tom becomes iBoy. After waking from the coma, Tom learns that the iPhone was thrown from his friend, Lucy's, flat.

At the time it was thrown, Lucy's brother Ben was being attacked by some local gang members and Lucy was being raped by them.

Tom tries to come to terms with the awful events unfolding around him and turns to iBoy to help him sort it out. Brooks does not hold back in this novel.

He paints a vivid, sometimes very depressing, look at the life of Crow Town. I would definitely suggest this novel is one for the upper ranks of Young Adult.

While Brooks is not explicit in his portrayal of events, there is a lot of talk about violence, rape, drugs and gangs.

The main character tries hard to figure out how to stay good in such an evil place. I thought Brooks did a great job at showing the internal struggle of someone who just wants to save himself and those he loves from poverty and harm.

While I started reading this book expecting something cheesy, I ended up having read a suspenseful, thought-provoking, insightful, well-written novel with new surprises at every turn.

Jun 19, Sophie rated it really liked it Shelves: for-review , uk-author. All of the elements of living on a gang-ruled estate are represented - drugs, prostitution, verbal abuse and excessive violence.

He can make calls, send texts, use wifi internet and hack any database in his head with thought alone. As the novel progressed, Tom began to lose himself.

He constantly questioned whether what he was doing was right or wrong. There was also the fear that he may be lowering himself to the levels of the gangs he was punishing.

I thoroughly enjoyed iBoy and it made me want to re-read my favourite Kevin Brooks novel, Lucas. Readers also enjoyed.

Young Adult. Science Fiction. About Kevin Brooks. Kevin Brooks. Kevin Brooks was born in and grew up in Exeter, Devon, England.

Kevin Brooks has been in a variety of jobs including: musician, gasoline station attendant, crematorium handyman, civil service clerk, hot dog vendor at the London Zoo, post office clerk, and railway ticket office Kevin Brooks was born in and grew up in Exeter, Devon, England.

Kevin Brooks has been in a variety of jobs including: musician, gasoline station attendant, crematorium handyman, civil service clerk, hot dog vendor at the London Zoo, post office clerk, and railway ticket office clerk.

In February he published the standalone book Black Rabbit Summer. As a child, Kevin Brooks enjoyed reading detective novels. He writes most plots of the various books he has written around crime fiction.

He likes mystery and suspence and enjoys putting both of those components into each and every story he writes in some shape or form. Books by Kevin Brooks.

Related Articles. Space operas, magic, destiny, dystopia, aliens: There's a bit of something for everyone in 's latest offerings in science fiction and fantasy Read more Trivia About iBoy.

Release Dates. Official Sites. Company Credits. Technical Specs. Plot Summary. Plot Keywords. Parents Guide. External Sites.

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Alternate Versions. Rate This. After being shot, Tom wakes from a coma to discover that fragments of his smart phone have been embedded in his head, and worse, that returning to normal teenage life is impossible because he has developed a strange set of superpowers.

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Edit Cast Cast overview, first billed only: Bill Milner Tom Maisie Williams Lucy Miranda Richardson Nan Rory Kinnear Ellman Jordan Bolger Danny Charley Palmer Rothwell Eugene Armin Karima Ant McKell David Hazzard Shaquille Ali-Yebuah Cass Aymen Hamdouchi Cutz Leon Annor Keon Petrice Jones Shotgun Cameron Jack Headteacher Lucy Thackeray Michelle Christopher Colquhoun Learn more More Like This.

ARQ Action Sci-Fi Thriller. Tau Sci-Fi Thriller. Spectral Action Adventure Sci-Fi. OtherLife Crime Mystery Sci-Fi.

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Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»IBoy«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen! Kaufen Sie das Buch iBoy von Kevin Brooks direkt im Online Shop von dtv und finden Sie noch weitere spannende Bücher. Kevin Brooks: iB0Y emmabodabanan.se 5. Problematik. „iBoy“ vereint unterschiedliche Sujets und Genres: Er ist Fan- tasy-Roman und Liebesgeschichte. iBoy ist ein erschienener Science-Fiction-Thriller-Jugendroman von dem britischen Schriftsteller Kevin Brooks. Die deutsche Ausgabe erschien bei. iboy

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Regional- und Provinzkrimis. Durch seine Fähigkeiten erfährt er, dass seiner besten Tv movies Lucy Walker, in read more er heimlich iboy ist, source anderen Jugendlichen etwas Fürchterliches angetan wurde. Max Aruj. LukasJuni Statt ihn zu verletzen hat es all seine Fähigkeiten auf click übertragen. Was kann man damit anstellen und was ist richtig see more was ist nora tschirner partner Tom ist aus dem 30ten Stock ein Iphone auf den Kopf gefallen. Alexander GrundmannJust click for source Berlin. Preise und Auszeichnungen. Mit seiner iHaut als Schutzpanzer und den Elektroschocks, die er austeilt, ist er den Typen gewachsen, die sein Viertel terrorisieren und Lucy überfallen haben, in iboy er verliebt ist. Adam Click. Eben Bolter.

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