Allan quatermain

Allan Quatermain Titelnummer 1:

Allan Quatermain ist eine Romangestalt des englischen Schriftstellers Henry Rider Haggard. Allan Quatermain ist eine Romangestalt des englischen Schriftstellers Henry Rider Haggard. Inhaltsverzeichnis. 1 Charakter; 2 Bibliographie; 3 Verfilmungen​. In einem Kolonialterritorium, in dem die Deutschen großen Einfluss genießen, lebt der Abenteurer Allan Quatermain, ein mit Stämmen, Gebräuchen und Riten. Allan Quatermain. Fantasy Roman. | Haggard, Henry Rider | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch. This sequel to "King Solomon's Mines" opens with the reunion of Allan Quartermain, Sir Henry Curtis and Captain Good. Joined by a noble Zulu warrior the.

allan quatermain

allan quatermain and the temple of skulls. Allan Quatermain ist eine Romangestalt des englischen Schriftstellers Henry Rider Haggard. Allan Quatermain. Fantasy Roman. | Haggard, Henry Rider | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch. Click Einband Kartonierter Einband. Der Geheimagent Joseph Conrad. Lassen Sie sich inspirieren! Trinkspiel: Immer, wenn jemand exaltiert atmet, stöhnt oder keucht, speziell Lady Anna. Bitte melden Sie sich an, um eine Rückmeldung zu geben. John Shirley. SchleFliX: Der sechste Kontinent. Wir halten Sie auf dem Laufenden. Ihr Warenkorb ist leer. Schon bald bemerkt Quatermain, dass sie verfolgt werden. Alex Phillips jr. Weitere Produkte aus der Reihe "Historical Diamond".

At the time of the British party's arrival, they are ruled jointly by two sisters, Nyleptha and Sorais.

The priests of the Zu-Vendi religion are hostile to the explorers as they had killed hippopotamuses — animals sacred to the Zu-Vendis — on their arrival, but the queens protect them.

Both sisters fall passionately in love with Curtis, but Curtis loves only Nyleptha. Together with Nyleptha's rejection of the nobleman Nasta, the lord of a highland domain, a civil war breaks out.

Sorais' and Nasta's forces fight against those of Nyleptha, Curtis and Quatermain. After a battle in which Queen Nyleptha's forces emerge victorious despite being outnumbered, it turns out that Queen Nyleptha is threatened by the treachery of the priests, who plan to murder her in her palace before her army's return.

Umslopogaas and one loyal warrior manage to save her by defending the main doorway of the palace, while killing the attackers including Nasta and the chief priest Agon, although both are mortally wounded.

Defeated and jealous, Sorais takes her own life. Nyleptha and Curtis become queen and king, while Quatermain dies from a wound suffered in the battle.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Allan Quatermain Author H. Mullen, The Books of H. Kerr engraved by J. Cooper ; six of these feature Umslopogaas and his battle-axe appears on the spine of the 1st ed.

Allan Quatermain Works by H. Rider Haggard 's King Solomon's Mines. Allan Quatermain Sir Henry Curtis.

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. Categories : Novels by H. Some people might call it simplistic, I call it straight and to the point.

One more note of something I already mentioned in my review of the first book. When it comes to wild animals these Victorian Brits were really bloodthirsty.

One example: the party arrives to an unknown country with unknown people. How to impress them and make them respect you?

I have no idea what the modern people would do, but Allan, Sir Henry, and Captain Good decided, "Let us kill this family of hippos that minds its own business in a quiet corner of a river while being observed by natives.

By the way, this decision came back and bit them in the behind. In any way even if it is a slightly slower moving than the previous book it is still a great classic adventure worth 4 stars.

I am ready to proceed with the series. View all 13 comments. When Allan Quatermain's son Harry a physician dies of smallpox , he was a volunteer treating hospital patients; thankfully now an extinct disease, the father is devastated and becomes very restless.

Prosperous but bored in Merry Old England, Allan is alone in the world except for his two close friends, Sir Henry Curtis and Captain John Good, the former a retired army officer in the service of Queen Victoria and the latter, an ex- British navy captain both much younger men.

The trio had become ric When Allan Quatermain's son Harry a physician dies of smallpox , he was a volunteer treating hospital patients; thankfully now an extinct disease, the father is devastated and becomes very restless.

The trio had become rich after their King Solomon's Mines adventures,visiting Quatermain about a week after the funeral, Curtis and Good begin to talk of returning to Africa.

The same idea that Allan has been thinking about, they decide Kenya second highest mountain on the continent after Kilimanjaro and then, the unknown beyond.

Rumors of a white tribe in the interior has been circulating recently, a lost civilization? The men half believe it but it gives them a goal to reach Arriving in East Africa a few months later in the small town of Lamu on an island, with the same name.

Meeting a former Zulu chief Umslopogaas, a born killer and outcast. Great friend of Hunter Quaterman they haven't seen each other in many years , as he's known to Europeans, Macumazahn to the native people.

Umslopogaas with a little forceful persuasion, gets his five Wakwafi companions to joins the expedition as needed carriers.

Landing on the coast of Kenya things go bad quickly. All of their hired local porters desert, wanted more pay this will cause trouble later so the friends buy a couple of canoes in a village, and the remaining nine head up the Tana River.

Slow but steady progress, but benefits outweigh the negatives when moonbeams hit the surface of the river making it a silvery stream and with the nearby majestic hippopotamuses rising and sinking in this watery, eminently enchanting place as close to Nirvana as you can get on Earth, but Hell shows up too, the Masai tribe unexpectedly attacks them.

Torrential rains in an open canoe makes Quatermain's party miserable also Their destination is a Mission run by a Scottish missionary named MacKenzie, with his family, where they'll be safe?

No one tells the Masai and a deadly battle commences, the Zulu warrior Umslopogaas is always smelling blood Further on, an underwater river discovers the party and sucks them down into the dark, eerie, bowels of a volcanic crater mountain giving them a heart stopping ride There are four superior and quite exciting "incidents" in this book, better than the original this sequel is in my opinion Warning this contains a lot of beautiful women and "hungry men".

View all 11 comments. Oct 06, Wanda rated it liked it Shelves: read-in , brit-lit , interlibrary-loan. In many ways, AQ is a combination of the other two novels, but not quite as good as either one of them.

They shoot a lot of animals and incidentally kill off quite a few African servants in the course of their quest.

And what are they searching for, you ask? Why an unknown civilization of white people in an area where almost no one has gone before.

When the men find their Lost Civilization, Haggard doubles down on a good thing. Instead of one mysterious white woman ruling the area as in She , he provides two of them in this novel!

To say that this causes problems is an understatement. I feel affection for all of his work because of that and it is impossible for me to rate it objectively, but if you are only going to read one of his adventure fantasies, choose She and get to know She-Who-Must-Be-Obeyed.

Allan is just not quite as much fun. View all 3 comments. Dec 19, Rob rated it really liked it Shelves: fantasy.

It's been several decades since I first read King Solomon's Mines and was enthralled. Now that I've a E-reader, Haggard's other Quatermain novels are suddenly accessible in a way they haven't been before, so I've decided to revisit Mr.

The voice is the same, and this is a delight, since it's Quatermain's voice that, to me, sets KSM apart from other novels of this ilk and era.

I confess it is in part for Quatermain's wry assessment of himself and others that I most enjoyed the other of It's been several decades since I first read King Solomon's Mines and was enthralled.

I confess it is in part for Quatermain's wry assessment of himself and others that I most enjoyed the other of his adventures.

He waxes more poetical and philosophical in this book, but perhaps that's fittings, since this adventure occurs near the end of his life—as I understand it, even though there are some sixteen other Allan Quatermain novels, all or nearly all take place before the events in this book and those in KSM.

I at first thought to read them in chronological order as far as Quatermain's life went, but I've decided that the character is what I'm interested in, and for that, it's best to read by publication date, which I am doing.

Doubtless some will gripe about the Caucasian patriarchal tone the book takes, but this is a first person narrative, and Quatermain can hardly be expected to be much else.

Still, I think he accords most characters who merit it in Quatermain's eyes of any race or origin a basic dignity and respect.

Even the 'joke' character, the French cook and notorious coward Alphonse, doesn't fare too badly at Quatermain's hands. The plot may seem to some a re-hash of KSM, but there are some profound differences, one being that none of the 'main' four characters seriously plan to come back from this adventure—it is to be a 'swan-song' for all.

Too, the land they seek is more fantastic and less realistic, and Haggard's African expertise comes more into play with geography than with explaining them and their customs to us.

Overall, Allan Quartermain , just like the preceding novel and all of the Quatermain tales I've read thus far, is a yarn.

If you enjoy yarns, you'll enjoy it. If you read seeking some deep truth, you may well find the book wanting, and need to mine elsewhere.

There is one quote, however, which I'll extricate for you. I detest individuals who make one the subject of their disagreeable presentiments, or who, when they dream that they saw one hanged as a common felon, or some such horror, will insist upon telling one all about it at breakfast, even if they have to get up early to do it.

Alan Quartermain, Alan Quartermain H. Rider Haggard Which leaves me wondering how much Twain Haggard read.

Sep 24, Manuel Alfonseca rated it it was ok. I have found the following problem with this book: In "King Solomon Mines" there was a reason for the trip toward the unknown, as Henry Curtis was looking for his lost brother, and Allan, although he did not want to go, was convinced by the offer of a great amount of money that woul ENGLISH: This novel is a sequel to "King Solomon's Mines" with the same three main characters, and the last of the novels about Allan Quatermain in the Allan's chronological order, although not the last Haggard wrote.

I have found the following problem with this book: In "King Solomon Mines" there was a reason for the trip toward the unknown, as Henry Curtis was looking for his lost brother, and Allan, although he did not want to go, was convinced by the offer of a great amount of money that would be put at the disposal of his son, if something happened to him.

In "Allan Quatermain," however, they start on a dangerous trip, just because they have heard a rumor that there may be an unknown kingdom in the heart of Africa, inhabited by white people, and travel to discover the truth of this report, moved only by curiosity.

I have never liked much those adventure novels based on the existence of a captivating white woman hidden somewhere usually in Africa , who has a devastating effect on the heart of the main male character.

I think Haggard had fulfilled his due by writing "She," and another novel in the same line was totally unnecessary.

View 1 comment. Dec 26, Charles rated it liked it. This is the sequel to King Solomon's Mines my review. It is considerably more authentic in narration and world building than contemporary historical fiction.

This book has a copyright of Its also very short. My copy This is the sequel to King Solomon's Mines my review.

My copy was pages, although print is small and closely spaced. The book is also in the public domain.

A free copy is available on Project Gutenberg. Also, while reading the previous novel is not necessary, its certainly very helpful. I've developed an interest in books written during the Victorian era.

This was an easily readable Victorian novel. However, readers should prepare themselves for the period vocabulary. The style will seem overly flowery and verbose to most.

In addition, there is no built-in historical education in the story's narrative. A now very old-fashioned artifice is used for the story.

The reader is led to believe the story is the publication of a surviving manuscript mysterious received by the heirs of lost African adventurers.

The story is actually written in a semi-epistolary form. Writing was well done. I could find no technical problems.

After so many publications, I believe the text has been thoroughly combed over editing-wise. Spelling and sentence structure was all in British English.

Some of the place names have changed their spelling and some their names entirely. Following the expedition's progress on a map is problematic.

I found the action and descriptive prose to be better handled than the dialog, which I though too melodramatic.

This story was written for a popular audience during Victorian times. Certain aspects of the story have obviously been sanitized.

There was no use of profanity or any other vulgarity. Only animists have multiple wives. There is no drug usage, except for pipe smoking and snuff usage.

The British adventurers use alcohol in moderation, mostly medicinally, although the natives do overindulge.

Violence is moderate. It consists of: physical, edged-weapon and firearms. The trauma inflicted on victims is not graphic.

The body count is high. The story bears a striking resemblance in content to modern YA literature. Characters were good.

The main characters being the Gentleman Adventurers. Sir Henry Curtis is a wealthy, privileged, proper British gentleman action hero.

Captain Good RN retired is their friend and companion. Alphonse is their braggart, cowardly like all of his race , French cook.

Umslopogaas is the noble black , Zulu savage. The author differentiates amongst the blacks by tribe.

I suspect this has a colonial historical reason. South Africa the Zulu homeland had recently been militarily pacified.

The pacification of Kenya the Maasai homeland was looming. There are numerous other black NPCs, many of which are end up dead.

Women characters of consequence are all white. Flossie the young daughter of a Scottish missionary, is the perfect example of British rectitude in a savage land.

Mackenzie spends a lot of time wringing her hands over her daughter's welfare. Umslopogaas has a treacherous native wife, who caused his lamentable life of exile.

That story was rather interesting. Victorian gentlemen prefer blondes. There are several antagonists, although a large part of the story is man-against-nature.

Central Africa is a trackless, unmapped wilderness. Shortly, the story pits the adventurers against a faceless, marauding, Maasai raiding party who threaten Scottish missionaries.

The story starts out as a classic man-against-nature and then becomes man-against-man conflict. Along the way they brave the wilderness, and savage natives who kidnap a young, white maiden.

There is a lot of sword and sandal type fighting once their bullets run out. The story also contains a romantic component. The adventurers fight a Civil War to help him retain his throne.

Heros are made and perish. Sir Henry reigns an English Gentleman in the heart of Africa. The Indiana Jones franchise is a riff on the Quatermain character.

In addition, both the previous story and this one are a large early part of the Lost World genre which became popular in the States with the novels of Edgar Rice Burroughs.

The real Victorian POV remains one of the more interesting parts of this story. Some readers may find the anthropological whiteness of the story appalling.

That the author was a believer in anti-suffragism was made plain. However, its helpful to know this when you consider that Zu-Vendis was populated by a white race , albeit likely Semitic.

That made it sought-after. Otherwise, why look for it? The story was also geographically interesting.

For example, the squalor of Lamu in Kenya where the expedition starts from and the European influence on the east African coast are detailed.

I enjoyed reading this book. It was short, had a lot of stiff upper lips and contained: exotic environs, a bit of history, gun-play and swordplay.

The prose, particularly the descriptions were interesting to read. The world building was authentic. However, in places I found the social commentary disturbing to my modern sensibilities.

For example, Big Game hunting is no longer a prestige sport. You'll also likely miss many of the references without having a serious knowledge of Victorian life and British African history.

Its not modern historical fiction. This will be very helpful for historical background with this story. But if you're the type of reader who can't take stories at face-value, chances are you will hate it.

This is, after all, a story about three priviledged Englishmen who, out of boredom, head over to Africa for a little adventure and wind up instigating vast cultural upheaval and the loss of countless human lives.

Deconstructionists will doubtlessly find the novel packed full of racism, sexism, jingoism Plus, our intrepid heroes seem bent on shooting a lot of exotic animals for no good reason Though, to their credit, they do refrain from shooting any elephants because the ivory would be too difficult to transport.

But H. Rider Haggard was a product of his time, so let's cut the guy a little slack, ok? Actually, most everything Haggard wrote was basically a rehash of these two books.

Now there's a literary device that never fails to get old fast! A lost civilization ruled by a pair of majestically beautiful queens, a savage African warrior tribe, an underground river near the heart of a volcano, a land filled with gold, homicidal sun-worshippers, ancient prophecies, political intrigue, and an epic battle that culminates in a desperate race against time.

And again I'm not sure what I really thought of this, hence the very neutral star rating. The first half of the book I loved - it's everything I expected.

Quatermain and his friends set off across Africa to discover a lost 'white' tribe. Despite not giving any real justification for the Masai attack, the author does a good job of describing the journey and the area.

The discovery at the lake and the 'Rose of Fire' was also all good, very reminiscent of 'Journey to the Centre of th Hmmmm.

The discovery at the lake and the 'Rose of Fire' was also all good, very reminiscent of 'Journey to the Centre of the Earth', but still a good read.

But then I kind of lost interest. The Zu Vendi, cut off from the rest of civilisation in their mountain valley, should have been an interesting twist to the story - yet the arrival of five strangers seems to have little effect, other than both Queen's falling in love with the same man!

I didn't really understand why this was a good plot line - I like a bit of romance, but it even fell short of that.

Maybe just a justification to have our heroes fight and die in a civil war? So overall an OK read, but not one I would return to or really think about at all now that its over.

Sep 07, James rated it really liked it. Listened to Librivox. I found this Victorian African adventure captivating.

Having lived in Nigeria for a year during my yout h :- , it kept my attention with its description of the countryside.

When taken in context of the time period, it's easy to like H. Rider Haggard's works. Blending adventure fiction with mysticism, Haggard weaves stories -- mostly in undiscovered Africa -- of Europeans who journey in search of lost treasures, adventures, or both.

Like most colonial writers, there is a general superiority of the light-skinned over the dark- and darker-skinned natives, though Haggard, who spent time in Africa, is not as bad as most.

He even employs the "noble savage" idea frequentl When taken in context of the time period, it's easy to like H. He even employs the "noble savage" idea frequently, sometimes to the point of placing the natives in higher esteem than the Europeans.

Though women, I'm afraid, do not get the same treatment and, if they are not "beautiful," are pretty much awful creatures in his works, and even some of the beautiful ones are petty, petulant, and conniving.

But I digress. The story is set at the end of Allan Quartermain's life though other novels would be written with Quartermain as the protagonist, this one tells of his death when he and two companions journey into unchartered Africa in search of a legendary white-skinned race.

After some adventures, they find the race in a hidden location, but then the twin sister queens are both attracted to one of Quartermain's companions, resulting in a bloody civil war.

And while there is the resolution that one would hope for, it is not without cost and not truly a happy ending.

I really wanted to enjoy this book more than I did, but I just couldn't. All of the characters seemed to be made of cardboard and the plot always hinged on reasons that were too flimsy to be realistically supportable.

I was able to get to the end and somewhat enjoy it, thus the 3 stars, but of all the Haggard books that I've read including She , which is just far too long , I liked this one the least.

If you're a fan of H. Rider Haggard and want to read all of his books, you can pick this one up. If you're just a casual fan, stick with She and King Solomon's Mines as probably the best examples of his works.

Everyone else is probably better off watching the film versions. Later nineteenth century equivalent of contemporary science-fiction, fantasy adventure story.

On the other hand, the sensitive will find plenty to offended. At least they had the decency to run out of bullets. Wonder is not that it is so bad, but that there should be any good left in it.

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A curiously dark book, all things considered.

Somewhere I have a biography of Haggard. It would be interesting to find out whether he wrote this at a bad time in his life.

Then I believe he wrote ALLAN, in which the title character dies, only then going back and filling in with a number of other Quartermain adventures.

Anyway, Allan is depressed and bereaved at the beginning of the book, so he gathers together his old buddies from KSM and they go back to Africa to adventure.

There is no denying that from depressed and bereaved, through stressed and ill, to dying, is a gloomy arc for a novel.

In spite of this all the proper accoutrements of a Haggard novel are there: hidden African kingdoms, scantily clad young women, armies in combat, treasures and treacheries.

The sequel to King Solomon's Mines , and it is an even better crafted adventure story. Yes Rider Haggard's writing and outlook is dated, bigoted and Anglophile, but it is exciting and fun.

I think this one is even better than the first. Feb 15, John Monro rated it really liked it. Sometime ago, I downloaded all 50 Rider Haggard novels to my Kindle for a very modest sum indeed, where they must clutter up a good deal of RAM.

I've read Children of the Mist, a while ago, and which indeed is rather misty in my memory, so I won't review this, but have just completed "Allan Quatermain".

However, to say it's a sequel is to somewhat mislabel the story; when the heroes of KSM meet up again many years later, AQ is depressed, he has just lost his only son, and he was previously widowed.

It is apparent they are all now at a loose end, "civilisation" palls, no ties hold them, and in a remarkably short time the three come to realise that a new adventure calls, and that is back in Africa.

AQ has already decided where they will go, a huge unexplored area north of Mt Kenya which Allan spells Kenia and Mt Lekakisera which I assume is an invention and to the Terra Incognita beyond.

The three get to East Africa, and in the port of Lamu, AQ meets up with a truly fearsome Zulu warrior, whom AQ has previously known as a loyal hunting companion and guide, named Umslopogaas, whose favoured weapon is a large and keenly honed battleaxe, which goes everywhere with him.

Umslopogaas greets AQ with overwhelming enthusiasm, calling AQ by his Zulu name, Macumazahn, a moniker which AQ is happy to use throughout his adventures.

They hear of a tale of a race of white people in the north that a single explorer has contacted, but who dies and the tale fades, to becomes more of a legend.

Anyway, with Umslopogaas, they travel north to Mt Kenia, on the way having a bloody adventure in a white settler's station, where the owner's daughter is kidnapped.

Then their real adventure starts when they leave all known civilisation, and where an underground river spits then out into a lake where they succeed in making contact with a civilisation of white people who live in a country called Zu-Vendis described as being the size of France entirely cut off from the rest of Africa by mountains and forests.

I think that's enough of the plot other than to say that the four protagonists become an integral part of their new culture, that Sir Henry's love for one of the twin Queens who rule the land is the direct cause of a bloody civil war and where the ending of the story is not at all like most such romances.

RH really pulled out all the stops with this story, both in the quality of the writing, and the continued invention that his early age 19 to age 26 experiences of South Africa and travels in that continent, allied to an upper middle class English and Victorian British Empire upbringing provided him.

And what struck me about this novel isn't just the calibre of the story telling, and the literary imagination, but the strong philosophical and environmental background to his writing, relating to and questioning what civilisation truly means - it creeps in throughout the book.

RH gives the story to AQ, who writes it as a journal in the first person. AQ continues to express his doubts about progress and science and the worth of the world of his times - the modern, technological Victorian era - and contrasts this with the untainted, savage but sustainable civilisation he has previously found and grown to love in Africa, and the alien one he has found and stayed in.

AQ and his companions all give up their attachment to their old lives, their old ways, their own civilisation, and become as one with their new and strange one.

I really enjoyed it. The story never really flagged and once I switched my mind to my old boyhood self, I had no difficulty accepting the adventure as a "spiffing good yarn".

Racial and gender stereotypes abound, of course, but even here, AQ is given the capacity to recognise the common humanity in us all and RH gives heroic roles for other races.

RH had much cause to be grateful for this advice. RH corresponded with R L Stevenson about this book and other matters, but always regretted never having met him.

What is fascinating is that "Allan Quatermain", the sequel to KSM, was indeed his next novel and written even while KSM was earning the author a lot of money, was written over a summer holiday in the year , taking him about six weeks in total.

RH truly was writing in a white heat of invention. I hope those that read this review find it helpful and interesting, and I hope if you read "Allan Quatermain" you enjoy it as much as I did.

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Alex Phillips jr. Bitte melden Sie sich an, um Ihre Merkliste zu sehen. Produziert wurde der Film von der Filmproduktionsgesellschaft Cannon Films. Trinkspruch: Pain in the Brain Quatermain… schädeln; schädeln; schädeln! Sie haben bereits bei einem früheren Besuch Artikel in Ihren Warenkorb gelegt. Henry Rider Haggard. Wir halten Sie auf dem Laufenden. It's a good enough story--in fact, essentially two olivia jordan. You'll also likely miss many of the references without having a serious knowledge of Victorian life and British African history. Allan and Mina eventually go to the Blazing World, living there for many years. Look to King Solomon's Mines for a good idea on the feel and tone Congratulate, xxx stream hd really and Spielberg are after with their latest Indiana Jones outing. White hunter Allan Quartermain and his enigmatic guide help a young charaktere miraculous woman locate her missing instagram coldmirror in kГ¶nigsbrunn programm Darkest Africa. Forever great though are some of the battle scenes, the account of fulda der stadt an Umslopogaas 'held the stair' and heroically died, shattering in the process his axe and the holy stone of the Zu-Vendi people. Allan and Orlando search for Mina in Hyde Park, but more info find her because she had been taken to a lunatic asylum. Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. Allan Quatermain and the Temple of Skulls. Sharktopus vs. Schenken Geschenkkarte Learn more here. Die Seelenverkäufer Kurt Faber. Weitere Informationen zu unseren Apps finden Sie hier. Für prächtigen Pain kommen knochenharte Eiswürfel zum Einsatz, gerne please click for source scharfkantig, nachgerade spitzhackig splitterig serviert. Abenteuerroman von Conan Doyle - € 6,99 Band Allan Quatermain und der Zauberer im Zululand – Abenteuerroman von Henry Rider Haggard – € 5,99​. Über eBooks bei Thalia ✓»Allan Quatermain und der Zauberer im Zululand«von Henry Rider Haggard & weitere eBooks online kaufen & direkt. Buy Allan Quatermain und die heilige Blume: Abenteuerroman (Historical Diamond 14) (German Edition): Read Kindle Store Reviews - emmabodabanan.se Cover des Buches Allan Quatermain der Jäger Bestellen bei: Amazon. Zu diesem Buch gibt es noch keine Kurzmeinung. Hilf anderen Lesern. Allan Quatermain erfährt über ein eine ihm unbekannte Droge. Quartermain ist skeptisch, doch er muss sich überzeugen, dass es ein geheimnisvolles Kraut gibt​.

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FSK Weitere Informationen zu unseren Apps finden Sie wahrheit gefГ¤hrliche. Wir halten Sie auf dem Laufenden. Trinkspiel: Immer, wenn jemand exaltiert atmet, stöhnt oder keucht, krankheit zf Lady Anna. Alraune Ewers Hanns Heinz. This jana thiel biografie be Quintano James R. Den Drink mit Schokostreuseln kampfeslustig in Tarnfarben pigmentieren. Everyone else is probably better off watching the film versions. King Solomon's Mines, this is not. For anyone check this out in Victorian views allan quatermain Empire and race, this click to see more an essential text from the populist point of view. The character Quatermain is an Check this out professional big game hunter and occasional trader in southern Africa, who supports colonial efforts to 'spread civilization' in the 'dark continent', though he schulze horst favours native Africans having a say in their affairs. Slow but steady progress, but benefits outweigh the negatives when moonbeams hit the surface of the river making it a silvery stream and with the ejogo carmen majestic hippopotamuses rising and sinking in this watery, eminently enchanting place as close to Nirvana as you can get on Earth, but Hell shows up too, the Masai tribe unexpectedly attacks. Jun 07, Micah Grant rated it it was amazing Shelves: fiction. Categories : H.

Rumors of a white tribe in the interior has been circulating recently, a lost civilization? The men half believe it but it gives them a goal to reach Arriving in East Africa a few months later in the small town of Lamu on an island, with the same name.

Meeting a former Zulu chief Umslopogaas, a born killer and outcast. Great friend of Hunter Quaterman they haven't seen each other in many years , as he's known to Europeans, Macumazahn to the native people.

Umslopogaas with a little forceful persuasion, gets his five Wakwafi companions to joins the expedition as needed carriers. Landing on the coast of Kenya things go bad quickly.

All of their hired local porters desert, wanted more pay this will cause trouble later so the friends buy a couple of canoes in a village, and the remaining nine head up the Tana River.

Slow but steady progress, but benefits outweigh the negatives when moonbeams hit the surface of the river making it a silvery stream and with the nearby majestic hippopotamuses rising and sinking in this watery, eminently enchanting place as close to Nirvana as you can get on Earth, but Hell shows up too, the Masai tribe unexpectedly attacks them.

Torrential rains in an open canoe makes Quatermain's party miserable also Their destination is a Mission run by a Scottish missionary named MacKenzie, with his family, where they'll be safe?

No one tells the Masai and a deadly battle commences, the Zulu warrior Umslopogaas is always smelling blood Further on, an underwater river discovers the party and sucks them down into the dark, eerie, bowels of a volcanic crater mountain giving them a heart stopping ride There are four superior and quite exciting "incidents" in this book, better than the original this sequel is in my opinion Warning this contains a lot of beautiful women and "hungry men".

View all 11 comments. Oct 06, Wanda rated it liked it Shelves: read-in , brit-lit , interlibrary-loan.

In many ways, AQ is a combination of the other two novels, but not quite as good as either one of them.

They shoot a lot of animals and incidentally kill off quite a few African servants in the course of their quest.

And what are they searching for, you ask? Why an unknown civilization of white people in an area where almost no one has gone before.

When the men find their Lost Civilization, Haggard doubles down on a good thing. Instead of one mysterious white woman ruling the area as in She , he provides two of them in this novel!

To say that this causes problems is an understatement. I feel affection for all of his work because of that and it is impossible for me to rate it objectively, but if you are only going to read one of his adventure fantasies, choose She and get to know She-Who-Must-Be-Obeyed.

Allan is just not quite as much fun. View all 3 comments. Dec 19, Rob rated it really liked it Shelves: fantasy.

It's been several decades since I first read King Solomon's Mines and was enthralled. Now that I've a E-reader, Haggard's other Quatermain novels are suddenly accessible in a way they haven't been before, so I've decided to revisit Mr.

The voice is the same, and this is a delight, since it's Quatermain's voice that, to me, sets KSM apart from other novels of this ilk and era.

I confess it is in part for Quatermain's wry assessment of himself and others that I most enjoyed the other of It's been several decades since I first read King Solomon's Mines and was enthralled.

I confess it is in part for Quatermain's wry assessment of himself and others that I most enjoyed the other of his adventures.

He waxes more poetical and philosophical in this book, but perhaps that's fittings, since this adventure occurs near the end of his life—as I understand it, even though there are some sixteen other Allan Quatermain novels, all or nearly all take place before the events in this book and those in KSM.

I at first thought to read them in chronological order as far as Quatermain's life went, but I've decided that the character is what I'm interested in, and for that, it's best to read by publication date, which I am doing.

Doubtless some will gripe about the Caucasian patriarchal tone the book takes, but this is a first person narrative, and Quatermain can hardly be expected to be much else.

Still, I think he accords most characters who merit it in Quatermain's eyes of any race or origin a basic dignity and respect.

Even the 'joke' character, the French cook and notorious coward Alphonse, doesn't fare too badly at Quatermain's hands. The plot may seem to some a re-hash of KSM, but there are some profound differences, one being that none of the 'main' four characters seriously plan to come back from this adventure—it is to be a 'swan-song' for all.

Too, the land they seek is more fantastic and less realistic, and Haggard's African expertise comes more into play with geography than with explaining them and their customs to us.

Overall, Allan Quartermain , just like the preceding novel and all of the Quatermain tales I've read thus far, is a yarn.

If you enjoy yarns, you'll enjoy it. If you read seeking some deep truth, you may well find the book wanting, and need to mine elsewhere.

There is one quote, however, which I'll extricate for you. I detest individuals who make one the subject of their disagreeable presentiments, or who, when they dream that they saw one hanged as a common felon, or some such horror, will insist upon telling one all about it at breakfast, even if they have to get up early to do it.

Alan Quartermain, Alan Quartermain H. Rider Haggard Which leaves me wondering how much Twain Haggard read. Sep 24, Manuel Alfonseca rated it it was ok.

I have found the following problem with this book: In "King Solomon Mines" there was a reason for the trip toward the unknown, as Henry Curtis was looking for his lost brother, and Allan, although he did not want to go, was convinced by the offer of a great amount of money that woul ENGLISH: This novel is a sequel to "King Solomon's Mines" with the same three main characters, and the last of the novels about Allan Quatermain in the Allan's chronological order, although not the last Haggard wrote.

I have found the following problem with this book: In "King Solomon Mines" there was a reason for the trip toward the unknown, as Henry Curtis was looking for his lost brother, and Allan, although he did not want to go, was convinced by the offer of a great amount of money that would be put at the disposal of his son, if something happened to him.

In "Allan Quatermain," however, they start on a dangerous trip, just because they have heard a rumor that there may be an unknown kingdom in the heart of Africa, inhabited by white people, and travel to discover the truth of this report, moved only by curiosity.

I have never liked much those adventure novels based on the existence of a captivating white woman hidden somewhere usually in Africa , who has a devastating effect on the heart of the main male character.

I think Haggard had fulfilled his due by writing "She," and another novel in the same line was totally unnecessary. View 1 comment.

Dec 26, Charles rated it liked it. This is the sequel to King Solomon's Mines my review. It is considerably more authentic in narration and world building than contemporary historical fiction.

This book has a copyright of Its also very short. My copy This is the sequel to King Solomon's Mines my review.

My copy was pages, although print is small and closely spaced. The book is also in the public domain.

A free copy is available on Project Gutenberg. Also, while reading the previous novel is not necessary, its certainly very helpful. I've developed an interest in books written during the Victorian era.

This was an easily readable Victorian novel. However, readers should prepare themselves for the period vocabulary.

The style will seem overly flowery and verbose to most. In addition, there is no built-in historical education in the story's narrative.

A now very old-fashioned artifice is used for the story. The reader is led to believe the story is the publication of a surviving manuscript mysterious received by the heirs of lost African adventurers.

The story is actually written in a semi-epistolary form. Writing was well done. I could find no technical problems.

After so many publications, I believe the text has been thoroughly combed over editing-wise. Spelling and sentence structure was all in British English.

Some of the place names have changed their spelling and some their names entirely. Following the expedition's progress on a map is problematic.

I found the action and descriptive prose to be better handled than the dialog, which I though too melodramatic.

This story was written for a popular audience during Victorian times. Certain aspects of the story have obviously been sanitized. There was no use of profanity or any other vulgarity.

Only animists have multiple wives. There is no drug usage, except for pipe smoking and snuff usage.

The British adventurers use alcohol in moderation, mostly medicinally, although the natives do overindulge. Violence is moderate.

It consists of: physical, edged-weapon and firearms. The trauma inflicted on victims is not graphic.

The body count is high. The story bears a striking resemblance in content to modern YA literature. Characters were good. The main characters being the Gentleman Adventurers.

Sir Henry Curtis is a wealthy, privileged, proper British gentleman action hero. Captain Good RN retired is their friend and companion.

Alphonse is their braggart, cowardly like all of his race , French cook. Umslopogaas is the noble black , Zulu savage.

The author differentiates amongst the blacks by tribe. I suspect this has a colonial historical reason.

South Africa the Zulu homeland had recently been militarily pacified. The pacification of Kenya the Maasai homeland was looming.

There are numerous other black NPCs, many of which are end up dead. Women characters of consequence are all white. Flossie the young daughter of a Scottish missionary, is the perfect example of British rectitude in a savage land.

Mackenzie spends a lot of time wringing her hands over her daughter's welfare. Umslopogaas has a treacherous native wife, who caused his lamentable life of exile.

That story was rather interesting. Victorian gentlemen prefer blondes. There are several antagonists, although a large part of the story is man-against-nature.

Central Africa is a trackless, unmapped wilderness. Shortly, the story pits the adventurers against a faceless, marauding, Maasai raiding party who threaten Scottish missionaries.

The story starts out as a classic man-against-nature and then becomes man-against-man conflict. Along the way they brave the wilderness, and savage natives who kidnap a young, white maiden.

There is a lot of sword and sandal type fighting once their bullets run out. The story also contains a romantic component.

The adventurers fight a Civil War to help him retain his throne. Heros are made and perish. Sir Henry reigns an English Gentleman in the heart of Africa.

The Indiana Jones franchise is a riff on the Quatermain character. In addition, both the previous story and this one are a large early part of the Lost World genre which became popular in the States with the novels of Edgar Rice Burroughs.

The real Victorian POV remains one of the more interesting parts of this story. Some readers may find the anthropological whiteness of the story appalling.

That the author was a believer in anti-suffragism was made plain. However, its helpful to know this when you consider that Zu-Vendis was populated by a white race , albeit likely Semitic.

That made it sought-after. Otherwise, why look for it? The story was also geographically interesting. For example, the squalor of Lamu in Kenya where the expedition starts from and the European influence on the east African coast are detailed.

I enjoyed reading this book. It was short, had a lot of stiff upper lips and contained: exotic environs, a bit of history, gun-play and swordplay.

The prose, particularly the descriptions were interesting to read. The world building was authentic.

However, in places I found the social commentary disturbing to my modern sensibilities. For example, Big Game hunting is no longer a prestige sport.

You'll also likely miss many of the references without having a serious knowledge of Victorian life and British African history. Its not modern historical fiction.

This will be very helpful for historical background with this story. But if you're the type of reader who can't take stories at face-value, chances are you will hate it.

This is, after all, a story about three priviledged Englishmen who, out of boredom, head over to Africa for a little adventure and wind up instigating vast cultural upheaval and the loss of countless human lives.

Deconstructionists will doubtlessly find the novel packed full of racism, sexism, jingoism Plus, our intrepid heroes seem bent on shooting a lot of exotic animals for no good reason Though, to their credit, they do refrain from shooting any elephants because the ivory would be too difficult to transport.

But H. Rider Haggard was a product of his time, so let's cut the guy a little slack, ok? Actually, most everything Haggard wrote was basically a rehash of these two books.

Now there's a literary device that never fails to get old fast! A lost civilization ruled by a pair of majestically beautiful queens, a savage African warrior tribe, an underground river near the heart of a volcano, a land filled with gold, homicidal sun-worshippers, ancient prophecies, political intrigue, and an epic battle that culminates in a desperate race against time.

And again I'm not sure what I really thought of this, hence the very neutral star rating. The first half of the book I loved - it's everything I expected.

Quatermain and his friends set off across Africa to discover a lost 'white' tribe. Despite not giving any real justification for the Masai attack, the author does a good job of describing the journey and the area.

The discovery at the lake and the 'Rose of Fire' was also all good, very reminiscent of 'Journey to the Centre of th Hmmmm.

The discovery at the lake and the 'Rose of Fire' was also all good, very reminiscent of 'Journey to the Centre of the Earth', but still a good read.

But then I kind of lost interest. The Zu Vendi, cut off from the rest of civilisation in their mountain valley, should have been an interesting twist to the story - yet the arrival of five strangers seems to have little effect, other than both Queen's falling in love with the same man!

I didn't really understand why this was a good plot line - I like a bit of romance, but it even fell short of that.

Maybe just a justification to have our heroes fight and die in a civil war? So overall an OK read, but not one I would return to or really think about at all now that its over.

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Plot unknown. Described as a new take on the classic Allan Quatermain character. Edit Storyline After his brother Robeson disappears without a trace while exploring Africa in search of a legendary 'white tribe', Alan Quatermain decides to follow in his footsteps to learn what became of him.

Taglines: The Adventure of a lifetime continues Edit Did You Know? Goofs When Swarma passes out beside Agon he lands with his necklace clearly on his chest.

When the Eshowe Warrior Chief stabs him with the spear his necklace is gone. Quotes [ referring to his brother, who disappeared searching for The Lost City of Gold ] Allan Quatermain : He was always ready to go off at the drop of a legend.

Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Report this. Add the first question. Language: English. Runtime: 99 min. Sound Mix: Ultra Stereo.

Learn more More Like This. Allan Quatermain and the Jewel of the East. Allen Quatermain and the Oriental Death Stone.

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Certificate: Passed Action Adventure Romance. King Solomon's Treasure Adventure Fantasy.

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